How to Help a Dog That Won't Put Weight on Its Back Leg


How to Help a Dog That Won't Put Weight on Its Back Leg

Dog Won’t Put Weight on Back Leg: Understanding the Causes and Seeking Treatment

When a dog won’t put weight on its back leg, it’s a sign that something is wrong. This can be a serious issue, as it can affect the dog’s mobility and quality of life. There are many potential causes for this problem, ranging from minor injuries to more serious conditions. It’s important to understand the underlying cause in order to provide appropriate treatment.

The inability of a dog to bear weight on its back leg can have various causes, such as trauma, arthritis, or even a neurological disorder. Understanding the cause is crucial for determining the appropriate treatment plan and ensuring the dog’s well-being. This article delves into the potential causes of this issue, explores the diagnostic process, and discusses the available treatment options.

Delving into the Underlying Causes and Exploring Treatment Options

dog wont put weight on back leg

Understanding the key points about “dog wont put weight on back leg” is crucial for pet owners and veterinarians alike. These points shed light on the underlying causes, diagnostic procedures, and treatment options associated with this condition, ultimately aiding in the dog’s recovery and overall well-being.

  • Injury: Trauma, sprains, fractures.
  • Arthritis: Degenerative joint disease.
  • Neurological disorder: Nerve damage, spinal issues.
  • Infection: Bacterial, viral, fungal.
  • Cancer: Bone tumors, soft tissue sarcomas.
  • Hip dysplasia: Abnormal hip joint development.
  • Luxating patella: Dislocating kneecap.
  • Cruciate ligament tear: Common knee injury.

These key points highlight the diverse range of factors that can contribute to a dog’s inability to bear weight on its back leg. Each condition has its own unique set of symptoms, diagnostic criteria, and treatment protocols. Understanding these key points allows for a more informed approach to managing this condition and improving the dog’s quality of life.

Injury: Trauma, sprains, fractures.

Traumatic injuries, sprains, and fractures are major causes of dogs not putting weight on their back legs. These injuries can occur due to accidents, falls, fights, or rough play. Understanding the different types of injuries and their implications is crucial for proper diagnosis and treatment.

  • Bone Fractures:

    A break in the bone can cause severe pain and lameness. Fractures can be closed (skin intact) or open (bone protruding through the skin). They can occur in various bones of the back leg, including the femur, tibia, and fibula.

  • Sprains:

    A sprain is a ligament injury caused by overstretching or tearing. Ligaments connect bones and provide stability to the joint. Sprains often occur in the stifle (knee) or hock (ankle) joints.

  • Dislocations:

    A dislocation occurs when a bone is forced out of its normal position in a joint. It can be a partial or complete dislocation and can affect the hip, knee, or ankle joints.

  • Muscle Tears:

    Muscle tears, also known as strains, occur when muscle fibers are overstretched or torn. They can cause pain, swelling, and difficulty bearing weight.

The severity of the injury, along with the dog’s overall health and age, will determine the appropriate treatment plan. Depending on the specific injury, it may involve rest, pain medication, splinting, or surgery. Early diagnosis and intervention are crucial for a successful recovery and minimizing long-term complications.

Arthritis: Degenerative Joint Disease and Its Impact on a Dog’s Inability to Put Weight on Back Leg

Arthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is a common cause of pain and lameness in dogs, often leading to an inability to put weight on the affected back leg. Understanding the relationship between arthritis and this symptom is crucial for proper diagnosis, treatment, and management of the condition.

Cause and Effect:
Arthritis is a progressive disease that causes the breakdown of cartilage, the protective tissue covering the ends of bones within a joint. As the cartilage wears down, it leads to inflammation, pain, and decreased joint mobility. This degeneration can affect the joints in the back leg, including the hip, knee, and ankle, making it painful for the dog to bear weight on that leg.

Components:
Arthritis is a key component in the development of lameness and the inability to put weight on the back leg. It is a chronic condition that worsens over time, leading to progressive deterioration of the joint and surrounding structures. As the disease advances, it can also cause bone spurs, ligament damage, and muscle atrophy, further contributing to the dog’s inability to bear weight.

Examples:
In real-world scenarios, dogs with arthritis often exhibit a reluctance to walk or run, and may even cry out in pain when attempting to put weight on the affected leg. They may also have difficulty rising from a sitting or lying position, and may walk with a limp or an abnormal gait. In severe cases, the dog may completely refuse to bear weight on the affected leg, leading to lameness.

Applications:
Understanding the relationship between arthritis and the inability to put weight on the back leg is essential for veterinarians and pet owners to make informed decisions regarding treatment and management. Early diagnosis and intervention can help slow the progression of the disease, reduce pain, and improve the dog’s quality of life. Treatment options may include pain medication, joint supplements, physical therapy, and, in severe cases, surgery.

Follow-up/Concluding Paragraph:
Arthritis is a debilitating condition that can significantly impact a dog’s mobility and overall well-being. Its role in causing the inability to put weight on the back leg highlights the importance of early detection and appropriate management. By addressing arthritis effectively, veterinarians and pet owners can work together to improve the dog’s comfort, maintain its quality of life, and potentially prevent further complications.

Challenge:
One challenge in managing arthritis-related lameness is the difficulty in determining the exact source of pain. Dogs cannot verbally communicate where they are experiencing discomfort, making it crucial for veterinarians to conduct thorough physical examinations and utilize diagnostic imaging techniques to accurately identify the affected joint.

Broader Connection:
Understanding the relationship between arthritis and the inability to put weight on the back leg enhances our comprehension of the complex interplay between degenerative joint disease and musculoskeletal disorders in dogs. This knowledge contributes to the broader field of veterinary medicine, aiding in the development of more effective treatment strategies and pain management protocols for dogs suffering from arthritis.

Neurological disorder: Nerve damage, spinal issues.

When discussing the causes of a dog not putting weight on its back leg, neurological disorders involving nerve damage and spinal issues cannot be overlooked. These conditions disrupt the communication between the brain and the affected limb, leading to lameness and an inability to bear weight.

  • Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD):

    This occurs when the soft, jelly-like discs between the vertebrae in the spine herniate or rupture. The protruding disc material can press on the spinal cord or nerve roots, causing pain, weakness, and paralysis.

  • Spinal Cord Injuries:

    Trauma, such as a car accident or a fall, can result in spinal cord injuries. These injuries can disrupt nerve signals and lead to paralysis or weakness in the hind legs.

  • Peripheral Neuropathy:

    Nerve damage in the legs can be caused by various factors, including trauma, metabolic disorders, infections, or toxins. This can lead to pain, numbness, and weakness in the affected leg.

  • Degenerative Myelopathy:

    A progressive neurological disorder affecting the spinal cord, commonly seen in older dogs. It leads to gradual weakness and paralysis in the hind legs, eventually causing an inability to walk.

Neurological disorders involving nerve damage and spinal issues can have a profound impact on a dog’s mobility and quality of life. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial to minimize pain, prevent further neurological damage, and improve the dog’s chances of recovery.

Compare & Contrast:
Unlike injuries or arthritis, neurological disorders affecting the back leg often manifest with additional symptoms beyond lameness. These may include loss of sensation, muscle atrophy, or difficulty controlling bowel and bladder function. Recognizing these signs can help differentiate neurological issues from other causes of back leg problems.

Infection: Bacterial, viral, fungal.

Infections caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi can also lead to a dog’s inability to put weight on its back leg. These infections can affect the bones, joints, muscles, or nerves in the leg, causing pain, swelling, and lameness.

  • Bacterial Infections:

    Bacterial infections, such as osteomyelitis (bone infection) or septic arthritis (joint infection), can spread through the bloodstream or via open wounds. They can cause severe pain, swelling, and lameness, making it difficult for the dog to bear weight on the affected leg.

  • Viral Infections:

    Viral infections, such as canine distemper or parvovirus, can also affect the musculoskeletal system, leading to lameness. These viruses can cause inflammation and damage to the joints, muscles, and nerves, resulting in pain and difficulty walking.

  • Fungal Infections:

    Fungal infections, such as ringworm or blastomycosis, can involve the skin, nails, and bones. While less common, they can cause pain, swelling, and lameness, especially if the infection spreads to the bones or joints.

  • Tick-Borne Infections:

    Infections transmitted by ticks, such as Lyme disease or Rocky Mountain spotted fever, can also cause joint pain and lameness in dogs. These infections can lead to inflammation and damage to the joints and surrounding tissues, making it painful for the dog to bear weight on the affected leg.

Infections in the back leg can severely compromise a dog’s mobility and quality of life. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent permanent damage and complications. Treatment typically involves antibiotics, antiviral medications, or antifungal medications, depending on the underlying cause of the infection.

Compare & Contrast:
Unlike injuries or arthritis, infections often manifest with additional symptoms such as fever, lethargy, and loss of appetite. Furthermore, infections can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated, potentially leading to more serious complications.

Cancer: Bone tumors, soft tissue sarcomas.

Cancerous growths, including bone tumors and soft tissue sarcomas, can significantly contribute to a dog’s inability to bear weight on its back leg. Understanding the relationship between cancer and this symptom is crucial for proper diagnosis, treatment, and management of the underlying condition.

Cause and Effect:
Cancerous tumors in the back leg can directly cause pain, lameness, and an inability to put weight on the affected leg. Bone tumors, such as osteosarcoma, can weaken the bone structure, leading to fractures and severe pain. Soft tissue sarcomas, like hemangiosarcoma or fibrosarcoma, can invade and destroy surrounding tissues, including muscles, nerves, and blood vessels, resulting in lameness and discomfort.Components:
Cancerous tumors can disrupt the normal function of the back leg by invading and damaging various components. These tumors can erode bone tissue, weaken muscles, and compress nerves, leading to pain, instability, and an inability to bear weight. Additionally, cancer can spread to other parts of the body, including the lungs or lymph nodes, causing further complications and potentially affecting the dog’s overall health and mobility.Examples:
In real-world scenarios, dogs with bone tumors or soft tissue sarcomas in the back leg may exhibit noticeable lameness, limping, or reluctance to walk. They may also show signs of pain, such as yelping or whining when touched or moved. In advanced stages, the tumor may cause significant swelling or deformation of the affected leg, making it difficult or impossible for the dog to bear weight on it.Applications:
Understanding the relationship between cancer and the inability to put weight on the back leg is crucial for veterinarians and pet owners in several ways. Early detection and diagnosis are essential for determining the type of cancer, its stage, and the appropriate treatment options. Treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these modalities. Additionally, managing pain and providing supportive care are important aspects of improving the dog’s quality of life and overall well-being.Follow-up/Concluding Paragraph:
Cancerous tumors in the back leg can severely compromise a dog’s mobility and quality of life. The relationship between cancer and the inability to put weight on the back leg highlights the importance of regular veterinary checkups, early detection, and appropriate interventions. By recognizing the signs and symptoms associated with cancer, pet owners can work with their veterinarians to provide timely and effective treatment, potentially improving the dog’s chances of recovery and long-term well-being.Challenge:
One challenge in managing cancer-related lameness is the difficulty in determining the exact location and extent of the tumor. Imaging techniques and biopsies are often necessary to accurately diagnose and stage the cancer, which can influence treatment decisions and prognosis.Broader Connection:
Understanding the relationship between cancer and the inability to put weight on the back leg contributes to the broader field of veterinary oncology, which focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in animals. By studying the mechanisms and effects of cancer on the musculoskeletal system, researchers and veterinarians can develop more effective treatment strategies, improve pain management protocols, and enhance the quality of life for dogs battling cancer.

Hip dysplasia: Abnormal hip joint development.

Hip dysplasia is an abnormal development of the hip joint, characterized by a shallow hip socket that does not fully cover the ball of the thigh bone. This condition can lead to instability, pain, and eventually arthritis in the hip joint. Hip dysplasia is a common cause of lameness in dogs, and it can also contribute to a dog’s inability to put weight on its back leg.

Cause and Effect:
Hip dysplasia is a primary cause of a dog’s inability to put weight on its back leg. The abnormal development of the hip joint leads to instability and pain, making it difficult for the dog to bear weight on the affected leg. As the condition progresses, the pain and lameness can worsen, eventually leading to the dog refusing to use the leg altogether.Components:
The hip joint is a critical component of the musculoskeletal system, allowing for movement and weight-bearing in the hindquarters. In hip dysplasia, the shallow hip socket and abnormal joint development disrupt the normal function of the hip joint, leading to instability, pain, and lameness.Examples:
In real-world scenarios, dogs with hip dysplasia may exhibit a variety of symptoms, including lameness, difficulty rising from a sitting or lying position, reluctance to walk or run, and pain when the hip is manipulated. As the condition worsens, the dog may start limping or even refuse to put weight on the affected leg altogether.Applications:
Understanding the relationship between hip dysplasia and a dog’s inability to put weight on its back leg is important for several practical applications. Early diagnosis and treatment of hip dysplasia can help prevent the progression of the condition and the development of severe lameness. Treatment options may include weight management, physical therapy, pain medication, and, in severe cases, surgery.Follow-up/Concluding Paragraph:
Hip dysplasia is a significant cause of lameness and an inability to put weight on the back leg in dogs. The abnormal development of the hip joint leads to instability, pain, and eventually arthritis. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can help manage the condition and improve the dog’s quality of life.Challenge:
One challenge in managing hip dysplasia is the difficulty in diagnosing the condition in its early stages. Signs and symptoms may be subtle or intermittent, making it difficult to detect the problem without specialized imaging techniques.Broader Connection:
Understanding the relationship between hip dysplasia and a dog’s inability to put weight on its back leg contributes to our overall understanding of musculoskeletal disorders in dogs. This knowledge helps veterinarians and pet owners recognize the condition, diagnose it accurately, and implement appropriate treatment strategies to improve the dog’s mobility and quality of life.

Luxating patella: Dislocating kneecap.

Luxating patella, or dislocating kneecap, is a condition in which the kneecap (patella) slides out of its normal groove in the thigh bone (femur). This can cause pain, lameness, and an inability to put weight on the affected leg. Luxating patella is a common problem in dogs, and it can affect one or both knees.

Cause and Effect: Luxating patella can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, trauma, and obesity. In some cases, it can be a congenital condition, meaning that the dog is born with it. Trauma, such as a fall or a blow to the knee, can also cause the kneecap to dislocate. Obesity can put extra stress on the knee joint, making it more likely to dislocate.

Components: The kneecap is a small bone that sits in a groove at the front of the knee joint. It helps to keep the knee stable and allows for smooth movement of the joint. When the kneecap dislocates, it can cause pain, swelling, and inflammation in the knee joint. This can make it difficult for the dog to bear weight on the affected leg.

Examples: Dogs with luxating patella may exhibit a variety of symptoms, including lameness, limping, and an inability to put weight on the affected leg. They may also have difficulty jumping, running, or climbing stairs. In some cases, the kneecap may dislocate and then pop back into place on its own. This can cause a clicking or popping sound in the knee joint.

Applications: Understanding the relationship between luxating patella and a dog’s inability to put weight on its back leg is important for several practical applications. Early diagnosis and treatment of luxating patella can help prevent the condition from worsening and causing permanent damage to the knee joint. Treatment options may include surgery, physical therapy, and weight management.

Follow-up/Concluding Paragraph: Luxating patella is a significant cause of lameness and an inability to put weight on the back leg in dogs. The abnormal movement of the kneecap can cause pain, swelling, and inflammation in the knee joint, making it difficult for the dog to bear weight on the affected leg. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can help manage the condition and improve the dog’s quality of life.

Challenge: One challenge in managing luxating patella is the difficulty in keeping the kneecap in place. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to stabilize the kneecap and prevent it from dislocating again.

Broader Connection: Understanding the relationship between luxating patella and a dog’s inability to put weight on its back leg contributes to our overall understanding of musculoskeletal disorders in dogs. This knowledge helps veterinarians and pet owners recognize the condition, diagnose it accurately, and implement appropriate treatment strategies to improve the dog’s mobility and quality of life.

Cruciate Ligament Tear: Common Knee Injury Affecting a Dog’s Weight-Bearing Ability

Cause and Effect: Cruciate ligament tears in dogs are a significant cause of lameness and an inability to put weight on the back leg. The cruciate ligament, also known as the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), is a major stabilizing structure within the knee joint. When this ligament tears, it can lead to instability, pain, and an abnormal gait. As a result, the dog may be reluctant or unable to bear weight on the affected leg.

Components: The cruciate ligament is a crucial component of the knee joint, acting as a stabilizer that prevents the tibia (shin bone) from sliding forward excessively on the femur (thigh bone) during movement. When the ligament tears, the knee joint becomes unstable, causing pain and difficulty in weight-bearing.

Examples: Dogs with a cruciate ligament tear often exhibit noticeable lameness, limping, or skipping a step on the affected leg. They may also be reluctant to jump, run, or climb stairs. In severe cases, the dog may completely avoid putting weight on the injured leg, leading to a non-weight-bearing lameness.

Applications: Understanding the relationship between cruciate ligament tears and a dog’s inability to put weight on the back leg is important for several practical reasons. Early diagnosis and treatment of a cruciate ligament tear can help prevent further damage to the knee joint and improve the dog’s prognosis. Treatment options may include surgery, physical therapy, and pain management.

Follow-up/Concluding Paragraph: Cruciate ligament tears are a common knee injury in dogs, often resulting in an inability to put weight on the back leg. The ligament’s role in stabilizing the knee joint is critical for proper weight-bearing and mobility. Recognizing the signs and symptoms associated with cruciate ligament tears allows for timely intervention, improving the dog’s chances of recovery and long-term quality of life.

Challenge: One challenge in managing cruciate ligament tears is the potential for long-term lameness or arthritis in the affected knee joint. This highlights the importance of early diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and ongoing rehabilitation to minimize the risk of complications.

Broader Connection: Understanding the relationship between cruciate ligament tears and a dog’s inability to put weight on the back leg enhances our understanding of musculoskeletal disorders in dogs. This knowledge contributes to the broader field of veterinary orthopedics, aiding in the development of innovative treatment strategies and rehabilitation protocols for dogs suffering from knee injuries.

FAQ

This section aims to address frequently asked questions and provide clarity on various aspects related to the main topic. From causes and symptoms to diagnosis and treatment options, these FAQs offer valuable insights for readers seeking more information.

Question 1: What are the common causes of a dog not putting weight on its back leg?

Answer: There are several potential causes for a dog’s inability to bear weight on its back leg. These may include injuries like fractures or sprains, arthritis, neurological disorders, infections, cancer, hip dysplasia, luxating patella, or cruciate ligament tears.

Question 2: How can I tell if my dog has a back leg injury?

Answer: Signs and symptoms of a back leg injury in dogs can include limping, lameness, yelping or whining when the leg is touched or moved, swelling, bruising, and an abnormal gait. If you observe any of these signs, it’s important to consult a veterinarian promptly.

Question 3: What is the significance of early diagnosis and treatment in cases of back leg issues?

Answer: Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for a dog’s recovery and long-term well-being. Prompt intervention can help minimize pain, prevent further damage, and improve the chances of a successful outcome. Delaying treatment can lead to complications and a poorer prognosis.

Question 4: What diagnostic tests might be performed to determine the cause of my dog’s back leg problem?

Answer: Depending on the suspected cause, various diagnostic tests may be recommended by your veterinarian. These may include physical examinations, X-rays, blood tests, joint fluid analysis, or imaging techniques like MRI or CT scans.

Question 5: Are there any home remedies or natural treatments for a dog’s back leg issue?

Answer: While some natural remedies or supplements may provide supportive care, it’s essential to consult with your veterinarian before administering any home treatments. Self-medication can be dangerous and may interfere with prescribed medications or treatments.

Question 6: How can I prevent back leg problems in my dog?

Answer: Preventive measures to minimize the risk of back leg issues in dogs include maintaining a healthy weight, providing a safe and appropriate exercise routine, avoiding jumping from high surfaces, and ensuring regular veterinary checkups.

Remember, these FAQs offer general information and should not replace professional veterinary advice. If you have concerns about your dog’s back leg or overall health, it’s best to consult with a qualified veterinarian for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan.

Moving forward, the next section of this article will delve deeper into the various treatment options available for dogs experiencing back leg problems. We’ll explore surgical and non-surgical interventions, rehabilitation strategies, and pain management approaches to help your furry friend regain mobility and improve their quality of life.

Consejos

Esta seccin ofrece consejos prcticos y estrategias tiles para abordar el problema de un perro que no apoya peso en su pata trasera. Siga estos consejos para ayudar a su perro a recuperar la movilidad, aliviar el dolor y mejorar su calidad de vida.

Consejo 1: Busque atencin veterinaria inmediata: Si su perro muestra signos de dolor o dificultad para soportar peso en su pata trasera, acuda a un veterinario lo antes posible. El diagnstico y el tratamiento tempranos pueden marcar una gran diferencia en el pronstico de su perro.

Consejo 2: Proporcione un ambiente cmodo: Asegrese de que su perro tenga un lugar clido, tranquilo y cmodo para descansar. Evite las superficies resbaladizas o desiguales que puedan dificultar su movimiento.

Consejo 3: Mantenga un peso saludable: El exceso de peso puede ejercer presin adicional sobre las articulaciones y empeorar los problemas de la pata trasera. Si su perro tiene sobrepeso u obesidad, hable con su veterinario sobre un plan de dieta y ejercicio para ayudarlo a perder peso.

Consejo 4: Use arneses y correas especiales: Los arneses y correas diseados para perros con problemas de movilidad pueden proporcionar soporte adicional y facilitar el movimiento. Consulte con su veterinario o un fisioterapeuta veterinario para encontrar el tipo de arns o correa ms adecuado para su perro.

Consejo 5: Realice ejercicios de fisioterapia: La fisioterapia puede ayudar a fortalecer los msculos de su perro y mejorar su rango de movimiento. Su veterinario o fisioterapeuta veterinario puede recomendar ejercicios especficos para la condicin de su perro.

Consejo 6: Administre medicamentos segn lo prescrito: Si su veterinario le receta medicamentos para el dolor o la inflamacin, asegrese de administrarlos segn las instrucciones. Los medicamentos pueden ayudar a controlar el dolor y la incomodidad, lo que facilita que su perro se mueva y recupere su movilidad.

Consejo 7: Considere la ciruga si es necesario: En algunos casos, la ciruga puede ser necesaria para corregir la causa subyacente del problema de la pata trasera de su perro. Hable con su veterinario sobre las opciones quirrgicas disponibles y los riesgos y beneficios asociados con cada una.

Consejo 8: Tenga paciencia y sea constante: La recuperacin de un problema de la pata trasera puede llevar tiempo y esfuerzo. Sea paciente y constante con su perro durante el proceso de rehabilitacin. Con el cuidado y la atencin adecuados, su perro puede recuperar su movilidad y disfrutar de una vida plena y activa.

Conclusin: Siguiendo estos consejos, puede ayudar a su perro a superar el problema de no apoyar peso en su pata trasera y mejorar su calidad de vida. Recuerde que la atencin veterinaria temprana y el cumplimiento de las recomendaciones de su veterinario son esenciales para el xito del tratamiento.

Transicin a la conclusin: Estos consejos ofrecen estrategias prcticas y efectivas para abordar los problemas de la pata trasera en perros. Al seguir estas recomendaciones, puede ayudar a su perro a recuperar su movilidad, aliviar el dolor y disfrutar de una mejor calidad de vida. La conclusin de este artculo resume los puntos clave y enfatiza la importancia de trabajar en conjunto con su veterinario para brindar la mejor atencin posible a su perro.

Conclusin

Este artculo ha explorado las diversas causas, sntomas y opciones de tratamiento para el problema de un perro que no apoya peso en su pata trasera. Hemos discutido cmo las lesiones, la artritis, los trastornos neurolgicos, las infecciones, el cncer y los problemas ortopdicos pueden contribuir a esta condicin. Tambin hemos enfatizado la importancia del diagnstico temprano y el tratamiento adecuado para garantizar el bienestar y la recuperacin del perro.

En conclusin, es fundamental comprender que el problema de un perro que no apoya peso en su pata trasera puede tener mltiples causas subyacentes. Los dueos de mascotas deben estar atentos a los signos y sntomas de esta condicin y buscar atencin veterinaria inmediata. El diagnstico preciso y el plan de tratamiento adecuado, junto con el cuidado y la atencin en el hogar, pueden ayudar al perro a recuperar su movilidad y disfrutar de una vida plena y activa.

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